Blackpool trader sold fake 1D gear

One Direction - David Halliday admitted unauthorised use of a trademark referring to the boy band
One Direction - David Halliday admitted unauthorised use of a trademark referring to the boy band

The director of a Blackpool gift shop has admitted selling fake goods including Betty Boop mugs, Jack Daniels fridge magnets and One Direction bracelets.

David Halliday, director of Bowtique Birkenhead Ltd, which has a shop in Victoria Street, appeared beside his partner Alice Hartley in the dock at Preston Crown Court.

Blackpool Council takes counterfeiting very seriously and officers regularly inspect businesses throughout the town to ensure a level playing field for all legitimate, law-abiding businesses

Both were charged with counterfeit offences related to selling items bearing false trademarks.

But as Halliday, 29, entered his guilty pleas to 15 offences of unauthorised use of a trademark, Hartley, 27, pleaded not guilty to any involvement.

Trading Standards officers swooped on the shop in Victoria Street to discover a hoard of keyrings, mugs, plates, wristbands and fridge magnets bearing false trademarks.

They seized items with logos including Chelsea FC, Manchester Utd, Arsenal and Everton FC as well as 13 Obey baseball caps.

Closer inspection revealed the goods to be fake.

David Traynor, prosecuting, accepted that Hartley – who runs the Birkenhead branch of the store – was not aware her partner was selling counterfeit goods as she had simply “let him get on with running the shop”.

During a police interview, Halliday, of Queens Promenade, Blackpool, admitted he ran the Blackpool shop and did not carry out sufficient checks on the goods before they were put on the shelves.

Hartley, of Wyresdale, Bispham, had no knowledge of the sales, he said.

The pair have been granted bail and Halliday will return to Preston Crown Court on July 23 to be sentenced.

It is not anticipated Hartley will stand trial.

Coun Gillian Campbell, Deputy Leader of Blackpool Council, said: “Blackpool Council takes counterfeiting very seriously and officers regularly inspect businesses throughout the town to ensure a level playing field for all legitimate, law-abiding businesses.

“We also have a statutory role to protect the public and prevent them from being defrauded or put at risk by counterfeit goods which can sometimes be dangerous as a part of that.

“As well as receiving a standard criminal punishment, traders who are convicted of selling counterfeit goods will also be pursued via the Proceeds of Crime Act to ensure that crime does not pay.

“I hope cases like this will serve as a warning to other businesses – if you sell counterfeit goods, you can expect a visit from our team and will finish up with a criminal record.”