Builder submits Ernie site plans

An aerial view of the old Premium Bonds site at Heyhouses Lane/Moorland Road, St Annes
An aerial view of the old Premium Bonds site at Heyhouses Lane/Moorland Road, St Annes

A MULTI-million pound plan to transform the former government buildings site bordered by Heyhouses Lane and Moorland Road, St Annes has moved a major step closer.

Scheme proposer Telereal Trillium has submitted an outline planning application what it describes as “a vibrant mixed-use development, including housing, neighbourhood retail, healthcare and community facilities”.

The application comes after the proposal received what Telereal Trillium claimed was an encouraging response at a public consultation event held last October.

The plans would see redundant buildings on the site adjacent to the current Hewlett Packard offices demolished to make way for the mixed use development.

A spokesman for the company said: “These proposals offer an opportunity to bring this site back into use and would create fresh space where people would enjoy living, working and shopping. We are working with a leading urban design consultancy, Broadway Malyan, to realise this vision.

“We have received a great deal of positive comment from the consultations and have been mindful that the development should respond to both the needs of the local community and capacity of local infrastructure.

“The new development will see a greater proportion of green space than currently exists at the site and our studies suggest that there will be a reduction in the amount of traffic generated, compared to the site’s historic use.

“The new buildings will be more energy-efficient and we also look to support greener transportation through the provision of ample cycle storage and potentially electric car charging facilities.”

Following submission of the application, there will be a further period of consultation with Fylde Borough Council.

Details of the application are available for inspection on the council’s planning portal and at the council offices.

The complex formerly housed the Department for Social Services and the Department for Work and Pensions, employing over 2,000 people at its peak.

It was originally the home of Premium Bonds.