Celebrating heritage

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The Fylde’s rich heritage and architecture was celebrated as more famous buildings in the area than ever opened their doors as part of the national Heritage Open Days incentive.

Dozens of visiors made the most of the fact that St Annes Parish Church was involved in the free event for the first time.

Heritage Open Day organised by Lytham St Annes Civic Society at St Annes Town Hall. Margaret Race (left), chairman of the Friends of The Lytham St Annes Art Collection, shows The Italian Flower Girl (1870) by Eugene de Blaas, to Kris and Sandra Hallergard.

Heritage Open Day organised by Lytham St Annes Civic Society at St Annes Town Hall. Margaret Race (left), chairman of the Friends of The Lytham St Annes Art Collection, shows The Italian Flower Girl (1870) by Eugene de Blaas, to Kris and Sandra Hallergard.

The church which gave its name to the town joined the likes of Lytham Hall, St Annes Town Hall, Lytham Windmill, St Annes Masonic Hall and the White Church, Fairhaven in welcoming visitors.

“It’s a wonderful idea and we were delighted to be part of such a marvellous incentive,” said the vicar of St Annes, Fr David Lyon.

“Dozens of people came along and many said they had driven or walked past so many times but had never previously been in. We hope we can be involved in the event again next year.”

At St Annes Town Hall, involved in Heritage Weekend for the second year running, visitors had the opportunity to view rooms not normally accessible to the public, as well as prized artworks from the Lytham St Annes Art Collection, which are now in the process of being catalogued by members of the Fylde Decorative and Fine Arts Society on behalf of the Friends of the Collection.

Starting out 20 years ago with 700 sites, Heritage Open Days has since developed into Britain’s most popular grassroots heritage event, with participation more than since 2000.