Charity opens its doors to raise awareness of sight loss

Gazette reporter Charlotte Tuohy samples total blindness

Gazette reporter Charlotte Tuohy samples total blindness

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A charity which helps people who suffer from sight loss opened its doors to raise awareness about the condition.

N-Vision, in Bosworth Place, South Shore, invited volunteers and staff from Blackpool’s Victoria Hospital to take part in sessions which included being blind-folded and led around by a guide.

Brian Casey, who went blind after several sporting accidents, talks about his experiences with course speaker Judith Harrison

Brian Casey, who went blind after several sporting accidents, talks about his experiences with course speaker Judith Harrison

“The purpose of this is to understand the challenges faced and get a greater understanding of what we are trying to achieve here,” said N-Vision’s Community Service Manager Judith Harrison.

Frosted glasses were given to volunteers to give them an idea of the challenges facing people suffering from a form of sight loss,

They were also blindfolded and, led by a guide, taken around the building and outside.

Barbara Rigby, 72, from North Shore and a volunteer at N-Vision’s Talking Newspaper, said: “I just wish the whole world could have experienced what we have today.

The purpose of this is to understand the challenges faced and get a greater understanding of what we are trying to achieve here

Judith Harrison

“It’s made myself and everyone else much more aware of what anyone who is visually impaired is going through every day.

“What I have learned has given me a much better insight and has been a great experience.”

Almost two million people in the UK suffer with some form of sight loss – one in 30 people.

N-Vision, established in 1924, has helped countless people since it opened its doors in Blackpool.

Charlotte tries on glasses which simulate advanced cataracts

Charlotte tries on glasses which simulate advanced cataracts

“When people come to us with these serious conditions the first thing we need to address is the emotional side, then we work towards helping these people maintain their independence in the community,” added Mrs Harrison.

“I can only hope that services such as ours expand in the future to meet the needs of all those who experience sight loss.

“Centres like ours are places where people can turn to and receive guidance from the start of their journey leading up to independent living.”

Charlotte tries glasses which simulate macular degeneration

Charlotte tries glasses which simulate macular degeneration