£12m funding for St Annes sea wall gets go-ahead for design that retains much-loved seafront attractions

A £12.1m fund towards the regeneration of the St Annes sea wall has been approved by the Environment Agency.

Tuesday, 5th October 2021, 4:44 pm

It means work can go ahead on replacing the existing 660m long sea wall around The Island site to reduce the risk of coastal erosion and flooding to more than 500 properties and

businesses over the next 100 years.

The existing sea wall dates back to 1935 and is in a poor condition, resulting in frequent overtopping, flooding and damage to the seawall and promenade.

Artist impression of the sea defence at St Annes

Fylde Council says that with climate change and future sea level rises, the frequency and severity of overtopping and flooding is predicted to worsen, meaning action needs to be taken

imminently.

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The work will go ahead without any of the current seafront attractions being lost.

Coun Roger Small, chairman of Fylde Council’s operational management committee, said: “I am delighted the council has received approval with the necessary financial support for this

important scheme.

“The project will first and foremost provide security from rising sea levels for the next 100 years, but as we have seen with our other sea wall enhancements, it will bring in extra revenues

from increased visitors and users.

“I would also like to stress that this has been achieved by modelling the scheme so as to retain the much loved attractions.

“This is the opening investment in the St Annes regeneration projects that will ensure the town has a good future.”

Andrew Shore, area coastal engineer for the Environment Agency, said: “We look forward to working with Fylde Council to help deliver this ambitious project over the next few years.”

The project follows the success of the Fairhaven to Church Scar sea wall project completed last year.

Work at St Annes could begin as soon as January 2023 and be completed by August 2024. Meetings with stakeholders and public exhibitions of the proposals will be held before any works

begin.

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