Volunteers dig in to help repair Fylde Nature Reserve dunes after fire

Volunteers at Fylde Nature Reserve
Volunteers at Fylde Nature Reserve
Share this article

A hardy group of volunteers rallied round to give nature a helping hand following a fire which ruined a substantial section of a Fylde nature reserve.

Around a fifth of the grassland on the dunes between South Shore and St Annes was lost in the blaze in June and the Fylde Sand Dunes Project – a joint effort initiative involving the Lancashire Wildlife Trust, Blackpool Council and Fylde Council – has been working since to restore plant life.

Volunteers turned up at Fylde Nature Reserve  to help repair the damage caused by the fire in June

Volunteers turned up at Fylde Nature Reserve to help repair the damage caused by the fire in June

More than 20 people responded to a plea for help at a Community Action Day.

Fylde sand dunes project officer Amy Pennington was full of praise for their efforts.

“We are so grateful to those who came along and helped dig in and help restore plants damaged in the fire,” she said.

“The weather had been poor ahead of the action day so the turnout wasn’t as high as it might have been but all those who came along were full of enthusiasm and their efforts really did make a difference.

Volunteers at Fylde Nature Reserve

Volunteers at Fylde Nature Reserve

“Botanists told us it could take 10 years for some plants to return to the area of their own accord, which was a real concern, so we have been aiming to give nature a helping hand by bringing the seeds nearer the surface and giving as much as possible the opportunity to grow back.”

Volunteers at Fylde Nature Reserve

Volunteers at Fylde Nature Reserve

Volunteers at Fylde Nature Reserve

Volunteers at Fylde Nature Reserve